Tag Archives: moving with children

New Beginnings: Five Ways to Tell Kids about a Move So That They Do Not Feel Left Out

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“Change can be scary, but you know what is scarier? Allowing fear to stop you from growing, evolving and progressing” –Mandy Hale

 

It is no question that one of the most stressful events you will ever go through.

Unfortunately, moving is not one task you can opt to sit one out because at some point in your life, moving homes is going to be inevitable. Indeed, while the prospect alone would already seem intimidating to adults, what more on your little tots? Yes, moving would be difficult but if you have young children in tow, expect it to be even harder on them. Little children have an affinity for permanence insomuch that the idea of any kind of change would be scary to them. The moment you tell them that you are moving, it would feel as if their world is collapsing around them. Children can often feel uncertain about a move and would resultantly resist it in a myriad of ways.

When told about the move, they can often throw tantrums and would whine. They would often feel like they are oppressed by the prospect of moving and this is very much understandable. After all, to a kid, the home is their world—one that they associate with love, safety and family insomuch that the thought of leaving it behind can be terrifying. For older children, the prospect of leaving their school, friends, and teachers can be jarring to a routine they are used to. In this regard, it is best to tell them the news about your in an opportune moment. However, do not wait too long as they would also need the time to adjust to the news and make the resultant move go so much smoother.

So, make your move to Pioneer Woodlands or elsewhere go without a hitch by keeping these tips in mind when breaking the news to your children:

 

Tell them early

Once a decision has been reached, gather your family around and get them involved. The sooner you tell them, the better lest they think you are deliberately hiding something important from them. Remember, your older kids will want to know when you decided this the moment you tell them the news. To ensure that they would all equally feel in the loop, let them know that they are the first ones to know about your decision. By doing so, they would feel assured that they matter as well.

Hold a family meeting

After dinner, ask your family to stay behind before quickly going to their rooms or doing any chores. Similarly, you might wish to tell them the news in the family room, but make sure that there are no distractions such as the television or any other gadgets. Be careful not to break the news in public areas such as restaurants or parks as children need to express their feelings freely. Plus, you do not want to have to appease a crying child in the middle of a busy diner. Do it in an environment where everyone feels comfortable. Keep your kids at ease by not announcing the subject of your news until such time that you and your children already get to sit and talk together.

Remain open

Not every single one of your children is going to take your news easily. Understand that your kids might be upset and allow them to express their emotions—whether that may be anger to frustration. Allow them to ask you questions and answer them as honestly as you can. Give them time to process the news and accept that they might not be as receptive to the news as you expected them to be. More importantly, let them talk and listen to them. Let them know they are heard. Being able to talk and air out their frustrations and feelings about the matter would let them know that they matter as well.

Be firm about letting them know that the decision is final

Some children may wheedle out of their way about a possibility they do not like. However, let your kids know that the decision is final and be firm about it. If you wavered in your decision and should you express any doubts or worries, your children would feel uncertain and might even ask you to rethink the move. If you are having second thoughts, express these to your spouse when the two of you are alone or to a trusted confidante. Do not whisper at night or even talk about it when you are in your room. You will never know when little ears might be listening in.

Provide kids only with the information they need

In discussing the move, it is important to disclose everything your kids might want to know. However, you should be careful not to overwhelm them with information. Thing such as when the move would be, where, why and how are all pertinent things to answer when telling them the news. Should they want to know anything more, they would ask. Give them time to adjust to the news and do not bombard them with all the details all at once.

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